Information security, and how not to do it

On the 21st of this month, I received an email from a company*, advertising their upcoming online seminar, and various other online courses they ran, including ones on the Data Protection Act, and information security.
Since I wasn’t interested in their courses, and didn’t remember signing up to receive any marketing materials from this company,  I clicked on the unsubscribe link. However, when the unsubscribe page opened, the name and email fields were already completed…and none of the information was mine.
In fact, the email address was for a Junior School in Portsmouth (edited version below).

This is not great, in terms of information security…you know, that thing they’re running online courses on?
So, I replied to them within an hour, pointing out that the information in those fields was not mine, and they might want to do something about that.
To date, I’ve not received an acknowledgement of my email, or any form of response.
I was also not alone in receiving this email, and finding someone elses information in the form when following the unsubscribe link.

However, in the days since, the form the link leads to has changed….well, to be specific, the information viewable in the form has changed. Yes, it’s gone from being the contact details of the school in Portsmouth, to the address of a private school yesterday, and today, one for a university. The first two times, the emails were admin addresses, but the university address is the work email of an individual, with their proper name in it (instead of, as above “No” and “Thanks” being the name).

Now, mistakes happen, and making a link to a form that shows the details of the last person who’s used it was probably an accident. But this is not how you deal with it.

What would I have done if this had been my mistake?

  • When I got the email pointing it out, I would have responded to the person contacting me, apologising for the issue, and thanking them for bringing it to my attention
  • I would have deactivated the link immediately
  • I would have got whatever glitch it is that’s preserving the last page user information fixed
  • Once that was done, I would have emailed everyone that had received the previous email, apologising for the issue, and telling them that the unsubscribe link was now secure and anonymous
This company has done none of that. Allowing anyone to view names and email addresses of strangers is not as serious as sharing work or home addresses, or more sensitive personal information, but this is a company which is running a business specifically selling training on data protection, and information security. Hands up who’d feel confident about using their training, if this is how they put it into practice?
*I have not named the company here, but contact me directly if you would like to know who it is.

Author: Jennie

Law, libraries, books, crafts, and general geekery.

One thought on “Information security, and how not to do it”

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