I got tired of waiting

Well, 4 days after I’d been told my material would be taken off that site…it was still there. So I sent a further email saying if it was not removed immediately, I would be taking the matter up with their ISP (and many thanks to the peeps who commented, and gave me the info on how to do this if I needed to).

And I got a reply:

Hello,


As we have informed you before, we remove the details. Don’t worry. We have

stopped updating this section about 2 years before. So we are checking the

credentials of the articles section with design dept.

Surely we will remove it shortly.

Then, a follow up a few hours later:

Please check it, its removed.

And lo and behold, it is indeed gone…yay!

However, all that other content from other people/sites, harvested in 2008 is still sitting there. But telling all those people is a bigger job than I can take on…

I believe I know the name of this defence

It’s called “A Big Boy did it, and ran away”, aka “It wisnae us, Guv”

This is the text of the (to give them credit, admittedly fast) response I got from the website that was using my blog post, as mentioned previously:

Dear Sir,

Apologies for the issue.

Thanks for your information. we will remove the same. It was happened

by our operators who has posted about long back. We got permissions from the authors

that time. Some of the posts they have put like this.


Best Regards

Venkat Sure


So, according to them, it was posted on their site a while ago (I’m assuming in 2008, as that’s when the posts lifted from me and others were created), and they got permission from the authors at that time?
Well, unless I have changed personality since 2008*, I never gave that permission, so that’s no real excuse.
And…as of now, my content is still there. How long exactly should it take to remove my content? How long should I give them, before moving from Slightly Irritated into Quite Irate?
* Admittedly, this is a faint possibility – maybe I had a psychotic break, gave them that permission, and forgot about it, and neither I nor anyone else realised I’d been temporarily mad, and randomly giving away my intellectual property rights…

I am not a genius author

And, as many of my posts can prove, I’m no insightful writer, or awesome, world-shaking thinker. I know my level, and it’s kinda low 🙂

But I do write this blog, and it is all the product of my own, random mind. I don’t blog on legalish/bookish/techiesh stuff anywhere else, and I’ve never done a guest blog post elsewhere either: anything I write as “Jennie Law” is here, and only here. It may not be of any great intellectual value, I get no financial benefit from it, but it is mine, all mine.
So when I found that someone had come to my blog recently via a link on another site, to an old post from 2008 about ebooks, I wondered why they were looking at such old stuff, and who was referring to it.
I followed the link back, and I found that the entirety of the 2008 post on ebooks is available on the site where the visitor originated from, with a link at the bottom to my blog post. The company is SGD Networks, which appears to be based in India, and has nothing to do with libraries, or law, but a lot to do with web development, graphic design, and web hosting. There was no sign that I was the author of that post other than the link: it had just been copied and pasted onto this site. Along with, it would appear, lots of other articles from various sources, all from 2008 as well.
Now, my memory may not be razor sharp, but I’m pretty sure I’d remember if I’d been asked for permission for my work to be used elsewhere. And I wasn’t.
My blog is not under a Creative Commons license, so I certainly haven’t given freedom to reuse the content I create – it is up to me to decide where that content may appear.
So, I’ve sent a polite “you did not ask for permission to use my content, please remove it immediately” email today. Let’s see what happens, shall we?

Free SLLG member event in Edinburgh

Thanks to the lovely @technollama, I’m pretending to be professional, and organising an event for the Scottish Law Librarians Group. The Mighty Llama himself will be presenting on this topic:
Digital Copyright: The Next Generation
During the first decade of the century copyright law has been one of the most important legal issues when it comes to the Internet. Recent developments may give copyright law a different face for the next decade. From the passing of the Digital Economy Act, to the rise of user-generated content and open licensing schemes such as open source and Creative Commons, the future of copyright is shaping up to present an interesting juxtaposition between two very different ideas about content management.
Date: Thursday 1st July 2010
Venue: Edinburgh Training and Conference Venue, 16 St. Mary Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1SU
Time: 5.30pm
Members should have received their email invite by now, but if not, and you’re a member, email me on the address in the contact details on the right and I’ll add you to the attendees list.